June 2016 - The Annual General Meeting 2016, Hérault
Juin 2016 - L'Assemblée Générale 2016, Hérault

The AGM and three days of garden visits around Montpellier. Click on the tabs to see the report for each day.

Notre AG et trois jours de visites autour de Montpellier. Cliquez sur les onglets pour voir le compte-rendu de chaque journée

Click on the images to enlarge them / Cliquez sur les images pour les agrandir
22 June: Le Jardin de la Pompignane - A City Garden In Montpellier
missing img

The gates to Chantal and Andre’s garden give no indication of what treasures lie behind - unless you have read the diaries, of course! I had been asked to give a view of the garden from my perspective and so my particular interest was how different can the planting be in a garden on the Mediterranean coast to my garden in the west of the Aveyron, three hours’ drive north-west. I have tried not to include plants shown in previous reports though some were impossible to resist! I have also concentrated on those flowers and shrubs in flower at the time of the visit (22 June) but the positioning of the shrubs by Chantal made the most of the contrast in colour and shape of foliage.

The garden surrounds most of the house and within a relatively small area Chantal has managed to include a Mediterranean area, a tropical area, an experimental area, a potager and several other beds. The purpose of some of the original planting was, in part, to screen either cars or neighbouring buildings and because the garden is walled there has been plenty of opportunity to (very successfully) use climbers and small trees which, in addition to screening, give height and provide valuable shaded areas for sitting.

The entrance is via the potager...

missing img
Cardoons and verbascums in full flower

...and having passed a small building one reaches a beautifully shaped olive tree underneath which is a circular planting of lavenders and grasses in gravel, in addition to seven rosemary ‘balls’, all of which will give all year round structure.

missing img
Olive tree under-planted with lavender and grasses

In the same bed was the upright Seseli gummiferum, also known as Moon Carrot, which has rigid blue-grey carrot type foliage and many umbels of tiny white or pink-tinged flowers. It is monocarpic, so will die after setting seed in its second year. Hardy to -15°C.

missing img
Seseli gummiferum

In the Mediterranean bed, Romneya trichocalyx was in full flower (my first flower was out on my return, confirming my guess that my garden is at least a week behind Chantal’s). It provides a wonderful focal point, its white flowers and grey-blue leaves providing a contrast to the fine violet flowers and long, pointed leaves of the Tulbaghia violacea below and, alongside, the bronze-tinged small rounded leaves and bright blue flowers of Ceratostigma willmottianum.

missing img
Romneya trichocalyx in full flower
missing img
Tulbaghia violacea and Ceratostigma willmottianum

In addition, I have to mention two small trees, Chilopsis linearis and Chitalpa tashkentasis – both in full flower and stunning. The photographs show the chitalpa which is rustic to -15C and now on my list!

missing img
Chitalpa tashkentasis
missing img
... and in close up

In the shaded area, almost directly behind, is a path leading into a small seating area with bamboos, but the star of this show was the Hydrangea quercifolia ‘Snowflake’with shining, massive white blooms next to the large pinnate leaves of the South African plant Melianthus major.

missing img
Melianthus major (left) and Hydrangea quercifolia 'Snowflake’

Hidden (when the front door is closed!) in the centre of the house is a wonderful open patio, with several square beds, including four planted with standard osmanthus. One bed has become home to some self-seeded Glaucium corniculatum, with wavy blue-grey leaves, which Chantal has been unable to bring herself to remove as they have been flowering non-stop for months.

missing img
The patio
missing img
Osmanthus heterophyllus with Glaucium corniculatum below

Other plants here are Sarcococca hookeriana var. humilis, Ophiopogon planiscapus nigrescens, the black grass-like perennial, and, in large pots, Nandina domestica, even now, in June, a remarkable mix of bright red berries and small white flowers.

missing img
Nandina domestica

Stars of the east bed were Hydrangea ‘Annabelle’ and Hemerocallis sp. but the detail of these have been covered in the diary articles.

missing img
The east bed

Other plants featuring at this time of year were:

missing img
Salvia ‘Allen Chickering’, originating from California
missing img
... with pretty blue flowers, attractive even after the petals have gone
missing img
Crinum powelli, particularly the white form
missing img
Michauxia campanuloides, from the eastern Mediterranean

Michauxia is named after Louis XVI’s botanist, André Michaux, and has an absolutely amazing, stunning flower with reflexed petals. Hardy, but best treated as a biennial. I have seeds of another michauxia, M. tchihatchewii, which I will plant in late summer for flowering next year. Germination can take from 1 to 3 months.

missing img
Malvastrum lateritum

This small pretty mallow can climb or spread along the ground in the same way as a strawberry, which is where I found it, creeping along the ground under other plants.

missing img
Rehmannia elata

A plant known in the UK as the Chinese foxglove, Rehmannia elata, has a much longer flowering period than digitalis. I have this plant, but only since the spring, and am watching with interest how it responds to our (usually) colder and wetter winters.

And, no longer in flower, but with the evening sun streaming through it, it looked magical.

missing img
Allium christophii

I loved Chantal’s garden – really interesting plants and combinations. I think she ‘challenges’ her plants! She only waters when absolutely essential, usually only if the plants are young, or struggling. I also get the impression that she pushes them to the limits of rusticity. I share these views. I have well-drained soil and it seems to me that plants at the limit of their tolerance can stand lower temperatures in well-drained soil than plants in wet, badly-drained soil. I have lost more in a wet, warmish winter than in a dry, cold one. Yes, occasionally I get caught (in 2012 we had two weeks of -15C including two days of -20°C) but the rewards can be huge and after seeing such interesting planting I feel a few more trials coming on!

Text and photographs: Liz Godfrey

23 June: Parc Floral des cinq continents chez Eric Dubois
missing img
Hydrangea quercifolia, bambous et Sabal palmetto

Notre groupe n’a pas visité tout le jardin...il faisait très chaud.

Eric Dubois a écrit : « La nature ne parle pas et pourtant elle s’exprime mieux que nous. Elle nous a donné la parole pour que l’on puise parler d’elle »

La conception du jardin d’Eric est une association de plantes de climats méditerranéens des cinq continents harmonisés par le Feng Shui : Vent et Eau en Tibétain, jardin d’harmonie de la nature, du sol au ciel, respect de ce qui nous entoure. Le bien être dans un jardin, ne pas s’arrêter aux noms des plantes, adopter le végétal que l’on plante, connaitre ses exigences de vie.

Le jardin Feng Shui méditerranéen est un jardin naturel, pas d’efforts inutiles, pas de traitements. On taille juste les branches gênantes, on limite les plantes colonisatrices (et non mauvaises herbes), les feuilles mortes sont conservées, elles font de l’humus, juste de l’eau, utile pour les plantes.

C’est un jardin qui vit et bouge. L’éveil des 6 sens y est constamment exercé. Le respect et la connaissance des plantes, ombre, soleil, sol, hauteur, leur raison d’exister, tout est imbriqué.

Le ying et le yang (le négatif et le positif) constituent l’équilibre, les scènes de jardin bougent sans arrêt. On avance de quelques pas et le tableau est différent (ou la photo) …Trois mots qui décrivent ce lieu Feng Shui du parc Floral des cinq continents et de notre authentique pépinière qui comporte plus de 2000 variétés : "Simplement, Naturellement, Durable" dit Eric.

missing img
Eric Dubois

Dans cet endroit, tout semble normal mais tout est composé, c’est une question d’équilibre. La plante énergique comme le yucca est le gardien de la scène. Taxus baccata 'Fastigiata' donne d’autres énergies qui progressent et montent vers le ciel en continuant par Arundo donax var. variegata qui vient en contraste avec le cyprès bleu d’Arizona qui lui-même se retrouve avec le ciel bleu.

missing img
Le jardin d’Australie avec yucca, dasylirion et justicia

Les gens se sentent bien dans ce jardin car tous les éléments de la vie sont compris dans ce jardin.

Quelques photos du jardin et des plantes:

missing img
Knipnofia sp.
missing img
Justicia alba
missing img
Hydrangea quercifolia
missing img
Salvia regla
missing img
Solanum bonariense

Texte et photos: Chantal Maurice

23 June: Le Jardin d'Henri Nardy
missing img
Accueil parmi les vivaces colorées

Aux alentours de Lunel, aux portes de la Camargue Henri Nardy, pépiniériste, a crée il y a sept ans, un jardin sur une superficie de 3700 m2. A partir d'un terrain plat et uniforme, il a façonné des espaces et des volumes variés.

Pour cela, il a joué sur la diversité des structures végétales, les feuillages, la palette des couleurs et l'aménagement d'une mare et de plantes aquatiques.

missing img
missing img
Mare

On peut voir au détour des chemins des plantes originales, glanées à l'occasion de rencontres avec des passionnés de jardin.

missing img
missing img
Chemin parmi les arbustes
missing img
Foisonnement dans les feuillages et les couleurs
missing img
Henry nous montre des araucarias
missing img
Zanthoxylum sp.et Melianthus major
missing img
Salvia 'Indigo Spires' et Aloysia triphylla (verveine)
missing img
Ostrya carpinifolia (charme houblon)
missing img
Musella sp., Musa (bananier) avec feuilles pourprées, Cycas sp.
missing img
Solanum pyracanthos
missing img
Cynara cardunculus (chardon)
missing img
Yuccas et dasylirions
missing img
Araucarias

Sa serre promet des nouveautés à planter et ses collections d'arrosoirs et d'outils de jardin témoignent de son plaisir au travail de la terre.

missing img
Serre avec succulentes, cactées et euphorbes.
missing img
Arrosoirs
missing img
Outils
missing img
Escargots à la recherche de fraîcheur sur un tronc !

Texte et photos: Michèle Auvergne

missing img
Chapeau, Henry!
24 June: Olivier Filippi’s experimental garden
missing img

Olivier Filippi talked to us about some of the latest advances in his experimental research in the field of allelopathy. Allelopathy takes its etymology from the ancient Greek allelon which means ‘each other’ and pathos, meaning ‘suffering or passion’. The term ‘allelopathy’ can be used to describe all remote, biochemical interactions, direct or indirect, positive or negative, between one plant and another. These interactions are mediated by plant secondary metabolites, for example terpenoids, phenolic acids, flavonoids and alkaloids. They can be synthesized by living plants, or be generated by the decomposition of a plant’s dead residue. The interaction can be positive, as in plants giving each other mutual assistance, or negative, resulting in exclusion. In his talk, Olivier concentrated exclusively on negative interactions. For more details, see this article on allelopathy by Catriona McLean.

Olivier Filippi nous a fait partager quelques-unes des dernières avancées sur ses recherches expérimentales dans le domaine de l’allélopathie. L’allélopathie tient son étymologie du grec ancien allêlôn, « l’un l'autre », et pathos « souffrance, passion ». On peut limiter la définition de l’allélopathie à l’ensemble des interactions biochimiques à distance, directes ou indirectes, positives ou négatives, d’une plante sur une autre. Ces interactions sont induites par des métabolites secondaires des plantes (terpénoïdes, acides phénoliques, flavonoïdes et alcaloïdes). Ceux-ci peuvent être synthétisés par les plantes vivantes ou être issus de la décomposition de résidus morts de la plante. Comme mentionné, les interactions peuvent être positives (entraide entre plante) ou négatives (exclusion). Ce sont les réactions négatives qui nous intéressent aujourd’hui. Pour plus de détails, voir l’article sur l’allélopathie de Catriona McLean.

missing img
Olivier Filippi standing on a carpet of pilosella, an allelopathic plant widespread in the south of France
Olivier Filippi les pieds dans la piloselle, une plante allélopathique largement répandue dans le sud de la France

Olivier started by placing the topic in context. He explained that our goal should be to use the specific properties of some wild plants to inhibit the growth of unwanted plants or ‘weeds’. One example is the mouse-ear hawkweed, Pilosella officinarum syn. Hieracium officinarum (so-called since hawks were supposed to drink its juice to improve their vision). This plant grows in southern France amidst other species but has a competitive advantage and can form large masses up to two metres in diameter. It does this by diffusing compounds through its roots which inhibit the growth of other plants. In other plants,chemical compounds are released when leaves are washed byrain, or spread on the ground by dew, for example Salvia leucophylla, or released by the decomposition of dead plant residue as happens with the leaves of phlomis and cistus.

D’emblée, Olivier Filippi situe le sujet dans son contexte : il s’agit d’utiliser les propriétés propres à certaines plantes sauvages pour inhiber la croissance des indésirables « les mauvaises herbes ». Un exemple connu est celui de la piloselle, Pilosella (ou Hieracium) officinarum(ou herbe à épervier car ces oiseaux étaient censés boire son suc pour améliorer leur vue). Cette plante vit dans le sud de la France au milieu d’autres espèces mais a un avantage compétitif et peut former des grandes plaques jusqu’à 2 mètres de diamètre. Elle diffuse par les racines des composés inhibant la croissance d’autres plantes. Dans d’autres cas les composés chimiques sont libérés par lessivage des feuilles par la pluie, ou plaquées au sol par la rosée (cas de Salvia leucophylla) ou libérées par décomposition de résidus morts dela plante (cas des feuilles de phlomis et de cistes).

The stakes are high for this field of research because in addition to using allelopathy as an alternative to herbicides in private gardens, large scale use in the maintenance of public spaces such as footpaths and cemeteries could decrease the use of pesticides. Olivier emphasized the complexity of the phenomenon; knowledge is far from complete and is evolving through collaboration with other experimentation centres to build up a database. Allelopathy is not a universal solution since allelopathic plants do not kill other plants, but only inhibit their germination. In addition, some plants are resistant to allelopathy (e.g. Geranium sanguineum and pioneer plants such as fennel) or they may have evolved to be less sensitive to it.

Les enjeux sont importants car outre l’usage en alternative de désherbants dans les jardins personnels, une utilisation à plus grande échelle dans la maintenance de divers espaces publics (par exemple allées des cimetières) permettrait de diminuer la pression pesticide. Olivier Filippi insiste sur la complexité du phénomène ; les connaissances sont loin d’être complètes et évoluent grâce au travail collaboratif avec d’autres centres permettant de constituer des banques de données. Il ne s’agit pas non plus d’une solution universelle car la plante allélopathique ne tue pas mais inhibe la germination. De plus, certaines plantes résistent (par exemple Geranium sanguineum et des plantes pionnières comme le fenouil) ou évoluent pour être moins sensibles.

missing img
A beautiful combination of Geranium sanguineum growing amongst Achillea umbellata, despite its allelopathic properties
Belle scène de Geranium sanguineum ayant poussé au milieu de Achillea umbellata malgré ses propriétés allélopathiques

One can achieve beautiful compositions in the garden using allelopathic plants of different heights, as shown in the photo below taken in Olivier's experimental garden. Plants with allelopathic properties do not harm each other, which makes sense, since these plants must be able to withstand allelopathic compounds in order to avoid them committing suicide through contact with compounds they produce themselves. At the end of the Filippi catalogue, there is a list of allelopathic plants grouped according to their height.

Il est possible d’obtenir de belles scènes allélopathiques de jardin en combinant des plantes de différentes hauteurs, comme l’illustre la photo ci-dessous prise dans le jardin expérimental d’Olivier Filippi. Les plantes allélopathiques ne se nuisent pas entre elles, ce qui est logique pour des plantes qui doivent résister aux composés allélopathiques sous peine de se suicider avec leur propre production. A la fin du catalogue de la pépinière, une sélection de plantes allélopathiques rampantes, basses, moyennes et hautes est proposée.

missing img
A garden composition of allelopathic plants including Euphorbia rigida, Tanacetum densum subsp. amanii, Armaria sp. and Santolina neapolitana.
Scène de jardin allélopathique composée de Euphorbia rigida, Tanacetum densum subsp.amanii, armoise, Santolina neapolitana.

In his experimental garden, Olivier highlighted how Rhamnus alaternus, Pistacia lenticus and Viburnum tinus can grow under the Aleppo pine (despite the allelopathic properties of its roots and decomposing pine needles). Should the Aleppo pine be destroyed by fire, these smaller plants would become dominant, and in this case the allelopathic properties of the lentisk would become evident. This provides an example of the complexity of these inter-related systems. Another example is phlomis, whose large leaves wither and fall in summer, releasing allelopathic substances as new leaves appear at the same time.

Lors de la visite de son jardin expérimental, Olivier Filippi montre quelques exemples : Rhamnus alaternus, le pistachier lentisque et le laurier-tin arrivent à pousser sous les pins d’Alep (malgré ses propriétés allélopathiques via les racines et la décomposition des aiguilles). En cas d’incendie qui détruit le pin d’Alep, ces plantes deviennent dominantes. Le pistachier a lui-même des propriétés allélopathiques qui se mettent alors en évidence. C’est une illustration de la complexité de ces systèmes. Les phlomis utilisent la dualité de leur feuillage: en été les grandes feuilles se dessèchent et tombent, libérant des substances allélopathiques alors que de nouvelles feuilles apparaissent en même temps.

missing img
Two types of phlomis leaves are visible here. The large green leaves are about to fall to the ground as new blue-green leaves emerge.
La dualité du feuillage de phlomis est bien visible: les grandes feuilles vertes s’apprêtent à tomber sur le sol, alors que les nouvelles feuilles bleu-vert poussent.

The purpose of creating an allelopathic section in the garden is to reduce the need for weeding. A variety of allelopathic plants should be planted on gravel (for example different species of creeping thyme, Tanacetum densum, Centaurea bella, Achillea umbellata etc.). The use of mineral mulch reduces the need for weeding whilst the young plants are growing because the allelopathic effect is not immediate and requires a few years to develop. Saffron bulbs and Sternbergia lutea planted in the gravel will provide colour and interest at the end of summer. Centaurea bella planted between paving stones thrives despite being trampled by foot traffic, which means it could also be considered for use in an allelopathic scheme. Here again Olivier pointed out that it is the number of different plant trials that enable progress to be made.

Un espace allélopathique dans le jardin est conçu de façon à limiter le désherbage. C’est un jardin sur gravier planté de diverses plantes allélopathiques (plusieurs espèces de thym rampant, Tanacetum densum, Centaurea bella, Achillea umbellata etc…). L’utilisation de paillage minéral permet de réduire le désherbage en attendant que les plantes allélopathiques se développent car leur effet n’est pas immédiat et demande quelques années d’installation. Les bulbes de safran et de Sternbergia lutea plantés sous les graviers assurent la beauté de l’endroit en sortie d’été. Centaurea bella placée entre des dalles s’est développée malgré les piétinements, ce qui fait envisager une possible utilisation dans ces conditions. Là encore on constate que c’est la multiplication des essais qui permet d’avancer.

missing img
Allelopathic zone in the gravel garden
Espace allélopathique (jardin de gravier)
missing img
Centaurea bella reduced in size by trampling
Centaurea bella miniaturisée par le piétinement

In another small area dedicated to trials, plants are being subject to harsh conditions with very little watering. One of the objectives here is to find out how long it takes for the allelopathic effect to appear. A range of sariettes and aromatic teucriums, amongst others, are being tried out in this bed.

Une autre petite zone est dédiée aux essais. Les plantes y ont été installées dans conditions dures de restriction hydrique. Un des objectifs est de déterminer le temps d’installation nécessaire à la plante pour obtenir un effet allélopathique manifeste. On trouve notamment dans cette espace des sariettes et des teucrium aromatiques.

missing img
Trial bed for allelopathic plants / Zone d’essais de plantes allélopathiques

Through planting aromatic plants in dry soils, we have all used allelopathy without knowing it. A better understanding of allelopathic plants allows us to select and combine them wisely. In Mediterranean gardening these plants have become an essential alternative to the use of herbicides.

Au final, en plantant en terrain sec des plantes aromatiques nous avons tous utilisé l’allélopathie sans le savoir. Une meilleure connaissance des plantes allélopathiques permet de les choisir et de les associer à bon escient. Ces plantes sont devenues des incontournables en jardinage méditerranéen en faisant partie des alternatives aux désherbants.

We thank Olivier Filippi for spending time with us and for his inexhaustible enthusiasm.

Nous remercions Olivier Filippi pour sa disponibilité et pour son enthousiasme inépuisable et communicatif.

Texte : Roland Leclercq
Photos : Liliane Leclercq